Tag Archives: Scottish Government

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Migrants vital to economy

Scotland’s 369,000 migrants from outside the UK are mostly young, economically active and highly qualified, according to new research and statistics.

One of two reports published today analyses European Economic Area (EEA) and non-EEA migrants and, for the first time, takes into account the 460,000 migrants born in the rest of the UK.

At least 50 per cent of people born in Scotland and all migrant groups (aged 16 or over) were in full- or part-time employment, or were self-employed.

22 per cent of migrants from the rest of the UK were retired, compared with 23 per cent of people born in Scotland. Just one per cent of recent migrants from outside the UK were retired.

Migrants from outside the UK who have been in Scotland for a longer period of time are more likely to identify their primary ethnicity as ‘Scottish.’

A further report examines the impacts that migrants and migration have had on Scotland’s economy, labour market, public services, communities and culture. Key points include:

  • Migrants, particularly recent migrants, are younger than the general Scottish population, economically active and healthy.
  • Europeans are also less likely to claim out-of-work benefits than people born in the UK.
  • Many sectors of the Scottish economy are reliant on migrant labour, including the NHS.
  • European migrants, particularly those who have moved to the UK in recent years, make a more positive contribution to the public purse, in terms of the taxes they pay and the costs of public benefits and services they receive, than migrants from outside Europe and people born in the UK.

Minister for International Development and Europe Alasdair Allan said:

“These statistics and the impact report confirm the long standing view of the Scottish Government that our migrant workforce make positive contributions to our economy and local communities.

“Many sectors of the Scottish economy are reliant on migrant labour, which helps meet demand for labour, and also address skills shortages.

“It is extremely important that we remain part of the European family, so that we can continue to have access to the European Single Market, and access to the free movement of people who may wish to live and work here. Our priority is to protect all of Scotland’s interests and we are considering all possible steps to ensure Scotland’s continuing relationship with the EU.”

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Analysis of the characteristics of migrants in Scotland, compared with people born in Scotland

Scotland’s Chief Statistician today released new analysis of migrants in Scotland, based on 2011 Census data. This extends analysis of recent and established EEA and non-EEA migrants (an official statistics report published in March 2015) by comparing the characteristics of non-UK migrants with people born in Scotland, and with migrants to Scotland from the rest of the UK.

At the time of the 2011 Census, just over half of all migrants living in Scotland (almost 460,000 people) were born in England. Over 369,000 people born outside the UK were resident in Scotland. The top overseas country of birth was Poland (approximately 55,000 people).

Migrants from outside the UK who had been in Scotland for a longer period of time were more likely to self-identify their primary ethnicity as ‘Scottish.’

Just over 40 per cent of migrants from the rest of the UK had degree level qualifications, compared with 22 per cent of people born in Scotland (and half of all non-UK migrants).

The age profile of the Scotland-born population and migrants from the rest of the UK was similar (with approximately 60 per cent under 50 years of age). ‘Recent’ non-UK migrants – those who arrived in the UK in the 10 years prior to the 2011 Census – were much younger: approximately 95 per cent were aged under 50.

At least 50 per cent of people born in Scotland and all migrant groups (aged 16 or over) were in full- or part-time employment, or were self-employed. 22 per cent of migrants from the rest of the UK were retired, compared with 23 per cent of people born in Scotland. Just one per cent of recent migrants from outside the UK were retired.

People born in the rest of the UK, and established non-UK migrants, were more likely to be in managerial and professional occupations than recent non-UK migrants and the Scottish-born population.

Migrants born in the rest of the UK were the population group least likely to live in urban areas: over 30 per cent were based in rural areas. They were also less likely to live in deprived areas than any of the other population groups.

Approximately 80 per cent of people born in Scotland and the rest of the UK (along with established non-UK migrants) assessed their own health as ‘good’ or ‘very good.’ This compares with 95 per cent of recent non-UK migrants.

The figures released today were produced in accordance with professional standards set out in the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Notes to editors

Scottish residents with a country of birth outside Scotland were classified as migrants. In the main, the report compares the characteristics of EEA and non-EEA migrants with people born in Scotland and migrants from the rest of the UK. The report is an extension of analysis published in March 2015, which investigated the characteristics of EEA and non-EEA migrants without comparative UK data.

EEA countries included EU member countries (excluding the UK) and Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. The non-EEA category included all other countries of birth, including Croatia which was not a EU member at the time of the 2011 Census.

The report further distinguishes those migrants who have arrived in the UK 10 years or longer ago (“established”) and those migrants who arrived in the 10 years prior to the 2011 Census (“recent”).

Findings are presented for Scotland-born, migrants born in the rest of the UK, recent EEA, recent non-EEA, established EEA and established non-EEA migrant groups.

A child was defined as a person aged under 16 years.

The full statistical publication is available at: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2016/10/6840

This publication contains analysis of the 2011 Census on recent and established EEA and non-EEA migrants, migrants born in the rest of the UK and people born in Scotland. The topics covered include origin and length of residence; personal and household characteristics, including language; geographic area and accommodation; education and employment; and health.

The findings can be used by those developing policy and planning services for migrants living in Scotland.

Related information:

  • Scotland’s Census website:

http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/

  • Scotland’s Census website – Additional Tables:

http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/ods-web/data-warehouse.html

  • Analysis of Equality Results from the 2011 Census; including ethnicity:

http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2014/10/8378

Official statistics are produced in accordance with professional standards – more information on the standards of official statistics in Scotland can be accessed at: http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/About

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Migrants vital to economy

Scotland’s 369,000 migrants from outside the UK are mostly young, economically active and highly qualified, according to new research and statistics.

One of two reports published today analyses European Economic Area (EEA) and non-EEA migrants and, for the first time, takes into account the 460,000 migrants born in the rest of the UK.

At least 50 per cent of people born in Scotland and all migrant groups (aged 16 or over) were in full- or part-time employment, or were self-employed.

22 per cent of migrants from the rest of the UK were retired, compared with 23 per cent of people born in Scotland. Just one per cent of recent migrants from outside the UK were retired.

Migrants from outside the UK who have been in Scotland for a longer period of time are more likely to identify their primary ethnicity as ‘Scottish.’

A further report examines the impacts that migrants and migration have had on Scotland’s economy, labour market, public services, communities and culture. Key points include:

  • Migrants, particularly recent migrants, are younger than the general Scottish population, economically active and healthy.
  • Europeans are also less likely to claim out-of-work benefits than people born in the UK.
  • Many sectors of the Scottish economy are reliant on migrant labour, including the NHS.
  • European migrants, particularly those who have moved to the UK in recent years, make a more positive contribution to the public purse, in terms of the taxes they pay and the costs of public benefits and services they receive, than migrants from outside Europe and people born in the UK.

Minister for International Development and Europe Alasdair Allan said:

“These statistics and the impact report confirm the long standing view of the Scottish Government that our migrant workforce make positive contributions to our economy and local communities.

“Many sectors of the Scottish economy are reliant on migrant labour, which helps meet demand for labour, and also address skills shortages.

“It is extremely important that we remain part of the European family, so that we can continue to have access to the European Single Market, and access to the free movement of people who may wish to live and work here. Our priority is to protect all of Scotland’s interests and we are considering all possible steps to ensure Scotland’s continuing relationship with the EU.”

read more