Recording of the week: exploding seed pods

This week’s selection comes from Cheryl Tipp, Curator of Wildlife and Environmental Sounds. The soaring temperatures of summer can have explosive results, especially if you happen to be standing near a gorse bush. This thorny, evergreen shrub produces an unmistakable sea of bright, yellow flowers from January to June. As…




Recording of the week: Nar Sur – a little known music genre from east Baluchistan

This week’s selection comes from AHRC Collaborative PhD candidate, Christian Poske. An unknown recordist captured this Baluchi folk song with a cylinder phonograph in Dera Bugti in Baluchistan in the winter of 1911. He noted down some information, including place and time of recording, topic of the song and instruments,…




Using wildlife sound recordings in the field

Coleridge research fellow Dr Alice Rudge writes: What are the uses of the recordings we make beyond preserving them? How might archiving wildlife recordings open up possibilities for interdisciplinary research, beyond the original purpose of the recording? During my anthropological PhD fieldwork with Batek people in Malaysia, which focused on…




Fulton at 50: how civil service reform affected government scientists

On 26 June 1968 Prime Minister Harold Wilson announced to the Commons the publication of the Fulton Report, the outcome of the first major inquiry into the civil service for more than 100 years. Photo credit: Contemporary Record, 2 (2) 1988, p.49 The committee, appointed in 1966 to examine the…




Recording of the week: "There was always the smell" – inter-generational memories of the steel industry

This week’s selection comes from Charlie Morgan, Oral History Archive & Administrative Assistant. The last time I wrote a recording of the week post it was about the artist Michael Rothenstein’s memories of growing up in the Cotswolds (C466/02). For him, these were all mediated through sights and sounds. This…